As Summer Begins, CDC Report Recalls Zika Risks


As Summer Begins, CDC Report Recalls Zika Risks

Earlier this month, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) released a report on a large study of the rate of birth defects for each trimester in which the mother became pregnant. The study confirmed earlier studies that a first trimester infection puts the fetus or child at greatest risk for developing related birth defects. In women with a confirmed Zika infection during the first trimester, 8% had a baby or fetus with Zika-related birth defects. That fell to 5% in the second trimester and 4% in the third.

As of June 7, there have been 627 Zika cases reported in the United States and its territories during 2017. All but one of the 125 cases in the United States were attributable to travel, while all 502 cases in U.S. territories were thought to have been acquired from local mosquitoes. The CDC continues to advise women who are pregnant or who may become pregnant to take precautions if living in or visiting south Florida, Texas, the U.S. territories, or anywhere with hot and humid conditions that are prone to mosquito infestations. As of June 15, Brownsville in Cameron County, Texas, is the only designated Zika cautionary area in the United States. Miami-Dade County in Florida was removed from this list June 2.